Worship

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Installation at Tabernacle Baptist Church

Cheesecloth banners, papier-mâché and other inexpensive materials are used to create the installations in the 128-year-old sanctuary of Tabernacle Baptist Church.
Photo courtesy of Tabernacle Baptist Church

10 tips for incorporating installations into worship

Vivid installations that change with the liturgical seasons are an integral part of worship at Tabernacle Baptist Church in Richmond, Virginia. The Rev. Sterling Severns shares advice for congregations that wish to experiment with this kind of creative visual approach to worship.

Installation at Tabernacle Baptist Church

Installations in the sanctuary at Tabernacle Baptist Church are designed to enhance the worship experience. This year's Lenten installation features a crown of thorns with long swaths of cheesecloth dyed in many colors to illustrate the theme of reconciliation.
Photos courtesy of Tabernacle Baptist Church

A congregation deepens worship with collaborative visual displays

Using materials as simple as duct tape, cloth and cinder block, the staff and laypeople at Tabernacle Baptist Church create visual installations that immerse the congregation -- including a significant population of Burmese refugees -- in the worship experience.

First Presbyterian's young people learn about worship at Kids Worship Adventure summer camp. Photos courtesy of First Presbyterian Church of San Mateo

Worship includes 'all ages and all stages' at a San Mateo church

At First Presbyterian Church San Mateo, worship is like Thanksgiving dinner, with everyone at the table. You might not like everything that's served, but everybody experiences the meal together.

The jazz communion during Labor Day weekend is an annual tradition at First Presbyterian Church of Clarks Summit, Pennsylvania. The Rev. Bill Carter is a professional jazz musician who performs with his band, Presbybop. Photos by Jeff Kellam

Jazz belongs in church

A pastor who is a trained pianist discovered that he did not have to choose between jazz and Jesus -- and that the spiritual power of the creative, improvisational art form can be a tool to help his congregation experience God.

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