Society

Most Recently Published

Four members of the five-person "God Squad" speak at a public lunch discussion at First Baptist Church in Tallahassee, Florida, on March 8. From left, the Rev. Dr. Gary Shultz of First Baptist Church; Rabbi Jack Romberg of Temple Israel; the Rev. Betsy Ouellette-Zierden of Good Samaritan United Methodist Church; and the Rev. Tim Holeda, the parochial vicar at the Catholic Co-Cathedral of St. Thomas More. Photo by Mark Wallheiser  

An interfaith clergy panel models civil discourse in public conversations about tough topics

Can people debate issues such as abortion, gun control and police brutality without anger and division? The five clergy who make up Tallahassee’s “God Squad” say it’s possible because of the friendship and faith at the core of their long-running civic experiment.

Pool ring floating in a swimming pool

Bigstock/kaisorn

Victoria Atkinson White: We need each other

In today’s world, we tend to choose friendships with like-minded people rather than investing in a broad community of “familiar but not intimate” relationships. That narrowing of casual relationships is killing our communities and driving us away from God’s work in the world, writes the managing director of grants for Leadership Education at Duke Divinity.

Pages