Reconciliation

Most Recently Published

Four members of the five-person "God Squad" speak at a public lunch discussion at First Baptist Church in Tallahassee, Florida, on March 8. From left, the Rev. Dr. Gary Shultz of First Baptist Church; Rabbi Jack Romberg of Temple Israel; the Rev. Betsy Ouellette-Zierden of Good Samaritan United Methodist Church; and the Rev. Tim Holeda, the parochial vicar at the Catholic Co-Cathedral of St. Thomas More. Photo by Mark Wallheiser  

An interfaith clergy panel models civil discourse in public conversations about tough topics

Can people debate issues such as abortion, gun control and police brutality without anger and division? The five clergy who make up Tallahassee’s “God Squad” say it’s possible because of the friendship and faith at the core of their long-running civic experiment.

Large crane hovers over a construction site near downtown Atlanta

A crane stretches above a building under construction in Atlanta. The author, who lives in the Atlanta area, writes that advocating for affordable housing is part of his call to the community. iStock/stevecoleimages

David Lewicki: Called to the ministry of affordable housing

Housing is a profound and even holy good, rooted in deeper notions of home, says a Presbyterian minister. Christians are called to re-create communities where people of every income level and race can make our homes together.

David Bailey

David Bailey, founder of the nonprofit Arrabon, onstage at the closing concert of a songwriting internship. Arrabon's programs provide leadership opportunities to minorities, women and others who don’t normally have a leadership development pipeline. Photo by Mike Morones

David Bailey: Christians and the work of reconciliation

We underestimate the brokenness brought about by racism -- and the creativity needed to reverse it -- but Christianity offers a way forward to healing and reconciliation, says the executive director of Arrabon.

Sanitation workers discuss their protest with the mayor of Memphis in a musical based on the 1968 Memphis sanitation workers’ strike, “Union: The Musical.”  Photo by Alex Maness

Creators of a new musical pursue healing and reconciliation

“Union: A Musical” tells the story of the 1968 Memphis sanitation workers strike. But its real purpose is to spark a conversation about racial and economic justice in the communities where it is performed.

Pages