Practices

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Female divers off the coast of Korea often hold their breath for several minutes at a time. When they emerge for air, they first exhale, emitting a distinctive cry, and then breathe in. Image from LisaSee.com/Financial Times

Gretchen E. Ziegenhals: Singing the life-giving song of exhalation

Korean sea divers exhale before they inhale, modeling a crucial pattern for sustaining the Christian life: exhaling for rest before inhaling for work.

Sister Jane Meuse, Elandria Williams, Rachel Plattus and Sister Lorita Moffatt gather for conversation during a residency in which young adults lived at the Sisters of Mercy's convent to learn about their way of life. Photo courtesy of Nuns & Nones

Nuns & Nones brings together religiously unaffiliated young adults and Catholic sisters

A six-month convent residency in California gave a group of millennials a window into communal living and discipline.

Cover detail from "Tracking Down the Holy Ghost" by Frank T. Griswold

Gretchen E. Ziegenhals: A prayer to begin the day

An ancient prayer helps today’s Christian leaders remember that God is already with us in our work, blessing, guiding and teaching us, writes a managing director at Leadership Education at Duke Divinity.

The Last Supper fresco by Leonardo da Vinci. Circa 1490s in Convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie in Milan.

Gretchen E. Ziegenhals: The holy work of seating charts

Arranging people in a room is holy work that requires managing power dynamics, cultivating crucial conversations and caring for people’s comfort, writes a managing director at Leadership Education at Duke Divinity.

The author's prayer beads are crafted out of blue stone beads from New Hampshire, a Russian bead from a friend and beads from one of her mother’s old necklaces. Photo by Jessamyn Rubio

Gretchen E. Ziegenhals: 'Living prayer' by praying with beads

Praying with beads provides a steady discipline -- a shape and a frequency for a life of prayer -- and a tangible tool that fixes our attention in a world of so many distractions, writes a managing director of Leadership Education at Duke Divinity.

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