Reflections

Reflection
November 17, 2014 | An Episcopal priest learns a valuable lesson from a run-in with a smartphone. The choice is yours every moment of every day: focus on lack or appreciate the abundance.
Reflection
November 17, 2014 | Many Christian leaders reject the notion of branding the church. But churches could use brand association as a signifier of identity, thus inviting people to step into mystery and wonder, writes a theologian.
Reflection
November 17, 2014 | There are a lot of leadership books out there, and many offer useful tools. But they work only if leaders are flexible enough to fit those tools to the situation at hand.
Reflection
November 3, 2014 | Games are powerful motivators, and they can change our behavior. In the church, we can track such practices as Scripture reading, prayer, hospitality and offering forgiveness.
Reflection
November 3, 2014 | Christian leaders must think about the place of images in their life and work, noticing that images are powerful, can be idols and can create the space for growth in discipleship, writes the New Testament scholar.
Reflection
November 3, 2014 | How can Christian leaders develop the healthy and confident sense of self necessary to lead effectively while at the same time denying themselves? asks the former dean of medical education at Duke University.
Reflection
October 20, 2014 | “Middle-ring” relationships have receded in the new social patterns of American life. We need imaginative Christian leaders to develop institutions that can support and sustain the community we now lack.
Reflection
October 20, 2014 | What can Christian leaders do when the official teachings of mainline Protestant churches and the political ideologies of the laity diverge?
Reflection
October 6, 2014 | The former president of Fuller Theological Seminary is no fan of Machiavelli. But he does wish for a 'seminary president's guidebook' that would match the scope and complexity of Machiavelli's writings on political leadership.
Reflection
October 6, 2014 | Pastors live with a painful inner conflict -- we often aren’t doing the good we want to do. Games, which can connect us to others and to a larger purpose, might help.